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Contains Nutrients and Beneficial Plant Compounds:

Lemon Blam

Melissa officinalis

Identification

There are over 700 species of eucalyptus trees, which take the form of tall trees or shrubs. The trees are native to Australia, and also grow in Northern California and the Mediterranean. Tall varieties like the blue gum can reach 230 feet. Most eucalyptus are evergreens, and the leaves have oil glands.

History

Oil distilled from the leaves of the eucalyptus was used in Australian Aboriginal medicine. The oil was applied topically to heal wounds. Leaves were made into a tea and used to treat fever.

Modern Usage.

Today, eucalyptus is used in commercial cough lozenges and mouthwash. The oil is used externally for rubs intended to relieve congestion. The leaves are widely available as an herbal remedy for use in tea to treat sinus congestion, bronchitis and the flu. These products are not designed for children.

Symptoms

According to North Carolina State University, the leaves and bark of the eucalyptus are considered poisonous in large amounts. If too much is ingested, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea can result. It is possible for an overdose to cause a coma. The oil should never be ingested in any amount, as it is highly toxic. The oil from the leaves can cause a skin irritation, but this is not considered serious.

Children should not ingest eucalyptus in any form, including in cough drops. If the child is over two years old, eucalyptus rubs may be safe, but use them only if directed by a physician. Adults should consult a qualified health practitioner before ingesting teas made from eucalyptus leaves. The leaves are toxic if ingested in large amounts. External use is safe for adults

History

Oil distilled from the leaves of the eucalyptus was used in Australian Aboriginal medicine. The oil was applied topically to heal wounds. Leaves were made into a tea and used to treat fever.

Eliminating Bacteria

Eucalyptus has been discovered to have antibacterial properties early on. Towards the end of the 19th century, it was used in English hospitals to disinfect urinary catheters, and recent research can support this claim. In a study published in the Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine (APJTB), researchers discovered that essential oil extracted from Eucalyptus globulus leaves is particularly effective against common strains of bacteria, such as E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus.10

Helping Promote Oral Care

The compounds found in eucalyptus can help promote oral health. In one study, participants who regularly chewed on gum laced with eucalyptus extract had lowered levels of plaque accumulation, and had healthier gums overall.11

Helping Provide Respiratory Relief

Eucalyptus can help provide relief from runny noses, coughs and colds to help you breathe easier, as well as loosening phlegm, which is why you'll find it as an ingredient in many products such as cough syrups, rubs and vapor baths.

Helping Relieve Pain

In one study, researchers applied eucalyptus ointment on participants and discovered that it was able to help provide temporary pain relief, making it useful for athletes after a game. Furthermore, the findings suggest that it can be used as a passive form of warm-up due to its ability to raise muscle temperature.13